We’re going on a ‘treasure’ hunt!

One of my favourite children’s books is We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen, which is fun to read and chant along too. It can be quite interactive too, and kids love the repetition and rhythm. However, this blog post isn’t exactly about the book (although it has given me a good idea for a blog post about some of my favourite children’s books!)

What I actually want to talk about in this blog post is another program that has many potential teaching components within a program. I call it “Treasure Hunt”. Basically, it is like a scavenger hunt, there is a list of items to collect and the child has to find these items. It can be expanded or modified to suit all learner’s levels.

I would mainly use this program when I needed a bit of time to either talk to parents, or write up notes. Turning anything into a game is always a good motivator, especially if a sibling is involved and there is a little ‘friendly competition’.

Some of the types of things I would ask to be found in a treasure hunt include:

  • a small, blue, circular object (i.e. it could be a ball)
  • a book with the word ‘the’ in it
  • a book with an animal in it
  • something you write with
  • something that is green and found in the garden
  • something you can eat
  • a transport/vehicle/any other category
  • 5 toy cars
  • completing activities e.g. 5 star jumps
  • purple piece of clothing
  • go to the lounge room and get a pillow off the couch, and come back,
  • and many other ideas!

As you can see, there are many, many options of things you can ask. Instructions, attributes, sizes, colours, visual pictures, written words, categories, numbers, counting etc.

As I said, I like to use this activity when I am needing to multi-task, in particular, when discussing things with parents. It not only keeps the kids busy, but tests their ability to generalise skills learned to a slightly different time in the session. It is also great because it can be modified as needed for all different learners.

Another benefit is that siblings can be involved in the game, and I have found it is always good to find ways to incorporate everyone in the family into sessions. This activity ensures the sibling doesn’t feel like they’re missing out on anything, and you can build on sibling relationships and social skills. It is also great when the kids start sending each other on ‘treasure hunts’.

Plus, you can have a lot of fun with the different types of items to find on the ‘treasure hunt!’

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We’re going on a ‘treasure’ hunt!

The 7 Dimensions of ABA

This is one of the first things I came across in my more formal study of ABA, however I didn’t really pay too much attention until I did a little bit more further study for my BCBA.

The entire article is from quite a while ago, and is cited at the bottom of this article, however I have found thisย link to be quite useful in surmising the information.

In this blog today, I just want to discuss a little bit about each dimension and why I feel it is important in the work that I do. I think this is particularly relevant, and good timing for me to revise, as I am aiming to complete another subject towards my BCBA next month.

Study tip # 1 – I use the mnemonic ‘GET A CAB’ to label the 7 items ๐Ÿ˜€

Applied – the work we do, needs to be of socially, significant importance. That is, it needs to be relevant to the individual and make a change that will impact and make their life, and the people surrounding them lives, better. This is were person centered planning, family centered planning, quality of life, and individualised programs come into play. Not to mention, ideas related to inclusion and accessing the local community, and in Australia, the NDIS, having an effect. It is a nice aspect of ABA, and provides the underpinning for meaningful services and interventions.

Behavioural – we are concerned with the observable. All behaviour is observable and measurable (until we get to private events, which I am not even going to begin to try and understand on here)! However, if we have clear, objective, observable and measurable behaviour, we can collect meaningful data, create interventions and test to see whether those interventions make a difference, and prove the effectiveness of what we have done.

Analytical – this is the part I feel I have the least experience in. I think, indirectly, I can be quite analytical in the work I do, however, I often struggle to have the time, or correct guidance to implement potential treatment plans and validate their analytical value. It requires manipulating antecedents and consequences to bring about (or decrease) a particular behaviour. I think I do a lot of the manipulating to decrease and then once the behaviour is decreased, we are all pretty happy so it is all good, however I wonder if we were able to control and manipulate further, and produce some sort of experimental design, we may gather further information about the behaviour and what is mantaining it over longer periods of time? Anyway … food for thought for another day.

Generality – this is such an important dimension. What is the point of doing what we do, if it only works in one place? Or with one person? Or with one material? Or only at a certain time of day? We need to ensure that was we do in one particular set up, can be generalised and maintained to another environment, person, object etc. This is definitely an area where I find it is often very hard to generalise and replicate educational based research and interventions from research, to classroom practice. I don’t really have any great ideas for how to go about making this easier, I just want it to be easier ๐Ÿ™‚

Conceptual – This dimension focuses on the need for techniques and interventions being related to some sort of theoretical base, and with applied behaviour analysis, that is definitely the case with a lot of the strategies used. In regards to the way this is used in ABA, it makes for more meaningful and effective interventions – they are not just being pulled out of nowhere, there is already some semblance of reasoning there.

Technological – this notion is similar to generality, in the sense of we want things to be expanded on, however it directly relates to specific components of ABA being replicable, particularly with research. If what you have done, has worked so well, then I should be able to a) understand how you did it, through your extremely detailed research and b) replicate your study and achieve similar results. This is something I hope to be able to do one day soon, and I apologise to all those poster presenters at conferences, whom I judged harshly and thought “Pft, I already knew that, do something new!” But this is an important aspect as it builds on research already about there, and provides first time researchers, a starting point ๐Ÿ˜›

Effective – save the best for last! Of course, why would we do all this, if it wasn’t effective. We constantly take data on what we are doing, and this is something I have stressed to many people I have worked with over the years, so we can see if what we are doing, is working. And if it is not working, then we can review and see what we need to change, and where, so that we can ensure we are not spending time, money and resources on something that is not working. Although, by using strategies and techniques with many, many years research behind them, we should hopefully be on the right track to start with … but as it will be evidenced in my soon to come science post, we need to constantly be checking in on ourselves and evaluating what we are doing.

This was actually a really good refresher for getting back into study!


 

References

Cooper, J., Heron, E., & Heward, W. (2007). Applied Behaviour Analysis Second Edition

Baer, D.M., Wolf, M.M., & Risley, T.R. (1968).ย Some current dimensions of applied behavior analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 91-97.

Behavior Analysis Association of Michigan – Seven Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis

The 7 Dimensions of ABA